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Civil War: Peter Parker, Spider-Man

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The War has begun, sides have been chosen, and the die has been cast With the repercussions of recent events in Civil War spreading across the Marvel Universe, see how every action can have enormous consequences - even in Peter Parker's life. Collects Sensational Spider-Man #28-34.


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The War has begun, sides have been chosen, and the die has been cast With the repercussions of recent events in Civil War spreading across the Marvel Universe, see how every action can have enormous consequences - even in Peter Parker's life. Collects Sensational Spider-Man #28-34.

30 review for Civil War: Peter Parker, Spider-Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    If you want the quintessential volume to illustrate why it is so difficult to follow a simple (ha!) storyline within the context of a mega crossover event, here it is! Marvel’s Civil War is complicated enough to sort out as it is, but one would hope that a single collection would at least adequately explain, via a smaller glimpse, what’s happening to the titular character(s). Nope, not happening here! And it doesn’t help that these stories vary widely in quality either. Backstory – Peter Parker If you want the quintessential volume to illustrate why it is so difficult to follow a simple (ha!) storyline within the context of a mega crossover event, here it is! Marvel’s Civil War is complicated enough to sort out as it is, but one would hope that a single collection would at least adequately explain, via a smaller glimpse, what’s happening to the titular character(s). Nope, not happening here! And it doesn’t help that these stories vary widely in quality either. Backstory – Peter Parker was convinced by asshat Tony Stark to not only side with the pro-registration-and-pro-reveal secret identity heroes, but to unmask himself in public at a press conference. Now everyone knows, including the bad guys he’s been pummeling for years. Monkey poop hits the fan in a big way. The first story looks at the trickle-down effect Parker’s decision has on one person he has come in contact with – a student in his biology class. It’s excellent and Clayton Crain’s artwork is exceptional. The second batch of stories features villains billed as the Deadly Foes of Spiderman – Will O’ the Wisp, Scarecrow, Molten Man, the Chameleon and The Swarm (Bees and wasps swarm around a skeleton and make it come alive. It’s done with magic and mirrors, kids). When I’m thinking “Deadly Foes”, these losers wouldn’t be in the top ten. Maybe “deadly” was supposed to be ironic. Probably not. Then we jump cut from Spider-Man-Pro-registration darling to Spider-Man-arachnid on the run and it’s “Hey, what happened to about six months of continuity?" You have three issues each centered on his then-wife Mary Jane, Aunt May and The Black Cat. We get to learn 1) that Mary Jane is selfish, 2) how Aunt May coped when she Uncle Ben adopted Peter when she was 86 years old and 3) what the Black Cat looks like when not drawn by an artist fixated on her cleavage. As Marty Robbins would say, “El Paso”. FYI - Don’t ever let Aunt May bake cookies for you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    You know who doesn’t need your Civil War? Besides Axl Rose, I mean. Peter Parker could also do without it because it ain’t been nothing but trouble for the poor guy. Most of the major events for Spidey in this event happened in the main CW books or Amazing Spider-Man so what this collection focuses on is how the public revelation of his secret identity has impacted the people in Peter Parker’s life. There’s some decent stories with Aunt May, Mary-Jane, Felicia Hardy a/k/a The Black Cat, and even You know who doesn’t need your Civil War? Besides Axl Rose, I mean. Peter Parker could also do without it because it ain’t been nothing but trouble for the poor guy. Most of the major events for Spidey in this event happened in the main CW books or Amazing Spider-Man so what this collection focuses on is how the public revelation of his secret identity has impacted the people in Peter Parker’s life. There’s some decent stories with Aunt May, Mary-Jane, Felicia Hardy a/k/a The Black Cat, and even a random student from the high school science class Peter was teaching. There’s also a fair amount of time spent showing all his old enemies start coming out of the woodwork to attack him now that they know who Spider-Man really is, and that also puts May and MJ in constant danger. It all ends up being mostly a tease because it just flirts with the kind of stories I was hoping we’d get as on-going things to be explored after Peter came out as Spider-Man. However, since all this was wiped out about ten minutes after it happened and didn’t really matter it’s kind of like reading one of those What If…? issues. Not bad but ultimately pointless. It’d also be messy to read by itself since the stories happen as Civil War progresses with little to no explanation given as to what’s been happening with Spidey there.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    The only comic book I read today because it was such a drag. The artwork was horrible, by the way. They changed it up almost every issue and it was just a different type of horrible. When someone argues the side of anti-registration, one of the points they bring up is that the world/government will know their identity, thus endangering said powered individual's family. That is exactly what happens here. A ton of Spider-Man's rogues come after Peter, Mary Jane, and Aunt May. THANKS, TONY STARK. The only comic book I read today because it was such a drag. The artwork was horrible, by the way. They changed it up almost every issue and it was just a different type of horrible. When someone argues the side of anti-registration, one of the points they bring up is that the world/government will know their identity, thus endangering said powered individual's family. That is exactly what happens here. A ton of Spider-Man's rogues come after Peter, Mary Jane, and Aunt May. THANKS, TONY STARK. There's not much to this honestly. Bad artwork, mediocre plot, boring characters and dialogue.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    There's nothing particularly wrong with this, other than the fact that after Amazing Spider-Man Civil War, this seems like it was designed for 12yr olds. The art is great in the first issue of the volume, but after that I'm not a huge fan. The subject matter is also pretty ho-hum...I'm supposed to believe that the cut-rate Spidey villains can do so much damage to him while he's able to duke it out with Iron Man and Cap? There's a few good parts, when Aunt May foils a plan to kill her, and some s There's nothing particularly wrong with this, other than the fact that after Amazing Spider-Man Civil War, this seems like it was designed for 12yr olds. The art is great in the first issue of the volume, but after that I'm not a huge fan. The subject matter is also pretty ho-hum...I'm supposed to believe that the cut-rate Spidey villains can do so much damage to him while he's able to duke it out with Iron Man and Cap? There's a few good parts, when Aunt May foils a plan to kill her, and some stuff showing her bond with Peter since the death of his parents, but otherwise, meh. It affects MJ and May yes, but in a good scene with Sue Storm, Sue tells MJ to suck it up buttercup, she knew he was Spidey when they got married, so no complaining now. Not really related to Civil War at all, just happens to occur during that, and because of what happens there, but this isn't a necessary tie-in at all. Non-essential. Miss.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I'm rather new to reviewing comics, but this site includes them in the books I've read, and so shall I. I do not know enough about the practice of reviewing comics to properly address the art, so instead I will focus on the story. And what a story! This is the kind of thing that Marvel does well, I think. It is a decidedly personal story of inner conflict as Peter struggles between two political factions, both of which have good points (how rare that is in real life!). The importance, though, is I'm rather new to reviewing comics, but this site includes them in the books I've read, and so shall I. I do not know enough about the practice of reviewing comics to properly address the art, so instead I will focus on the story. And what a story! This is the kind of thing that Marvel does well, I think. It is a decidedly personal story of inner conflict as Peter struggles between two political factions, both of which have good points (how rare that is in real life!). The importance, though, is not in the political conflict, but in Peter's life as Spider-Man. He is forced to a point where he knows there will be repurcussions, both for himself and for those he loves, regardless of what he chooses. This is further complicated by the fact that those loved ones have opinions of their own. I think the relationship between Peter Parker and Tony Stark was one of the strongest parts of Civil War, and this book tells us Peter's side of the story well, with the characteristic Spider-Man humour, but a thoughtfulness that you don't always see in superhero comics. Fundamentally, I think, Peter finds himself in a position many people do: trapped between two sides, not based on an abstract ideology, but on the actual realities of his life. It is the clash of idealism with pragmatism, of selflessness on a societal scale with selflessness on a familial scale, and of ties of friendship with political disagreement. This is what I enjoyed about Civil War.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    This book takes place during the Marvel event of Civil War. This book details how Spider-Man's unmasking affects the people around him. This group includes Aunt May, Mary Jane, his students, and ex-girlfriends. My enjoyment of this collection went from end of the spectrum to the other end. There are seven issues in this collection and I would say about half of them were terrific while the other half were forgettable. Peter has always feared that his enemies will come after the ones he loves and t This book takes place during the Marvel event of Civil War. This book details how Spider-Man's unmasking affects the people around him. This group includes Aunt May, Mary Jane, his students, and ex-girlfriends. My enjoyment of this collection went from end of the spectrum to the other end. There are seven issues in this collection and I would say about half of them were terrific while the other half were forgettable. Peter has always feared that his enemies will come after the ones he loves and this proves to be true as his enemies know who he is now. I liked the story with Aunt May but the story with Mary Jane fell flat. That is a recurring theme in this collection. For every device or story I liked I can also point out something I did not. This could be said about the artwork too. Some issues I did not like at all but some had some amazing panels. This is not a necessary read for the overall story arc. It is more a view into the effects of the war on a small group of people. There were some highlights like the flashbacks from May and Black Cat but also there are some low points. I would only recommend this to the most die hard fans of Marvel and Spider-Man.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Labyrinth Rossiter

    The focus here, I think, is more on how Spidey's unmasking affects everyone else in his life: MJ, Aunt May, his array of villains, Black Cat, even Peter Parker's high school science students. Civil War: The Amazing Spider-Man actually deals more directly with Spiderman's perspective on the Civil War. I really liked that regular people in Spidey's life while under a great deal of pressure, Jordon (the student), MJ, and Aunt May (especially Aunt May!) have to prove themselves heroic in their own w The focus here, I think, is more on how Spidey's unmasking affects everyone else in his life: MJ, Aunt May, his array of villains, Black Cat, even Peter Parker's high school science students. Civil War: The Amazing Spider-Man actually deals more directly with Spiderman's perspective on the Civil War. I really liked that regular people in Spidey's life while under a great deal of pressure, Jordon (the student), MJ, and Aunt May (especially Aunt May!) have to prove themselves heroic in their own ways. The tone of Black Cat's story, both funny and bittersweet, was also appealing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Galbreath

    One of the strongest entries in the entire Civil War series, "Civil War: Peter Parker, Spider-man" shows the repercussions of Peter Parker revealing his secret identity during the main plot arc, including having to deal with villains inevitably coming after his loved ones. The first story, "My Science Teacher is Spider-man," was my personal favorite and put a creative twist on the narrative by telling the story from the perspective of one of the students from Peter's biology class. Imagine watch One of the strongest entries in the entire Civil War series, "Civil War: Peter Parker, Spider-man" shows the repercussions of Peter Parker revealing his secret identity during the main plot arc, including having to deal with villains inevitably coming after his loved ones. The first story, "My Science Teacher is Spider-man," was my personal favorite and put a creative twist on the narrative by telling the story from the perspective of one of the students from Peter's biology class. Imagine watching TV one day finding out "Mr. Parker" has been Spider-man since he was fifteen years old! It was incredibly interesting to see the superhero civil war from the viewpoint of an ordinary person close to Peter who is caught up in events. The conclusion was immensely satisfying. Plot-wise, most of this graphic novel involves Spider-man trying to keep his loved ones out of harm's way during the onslaught of villains like Dr. Octopus, Rhino, and the Chameleon. But the wonderfulness of "Civil War: Peter Parker, Spider-man" is much deeper than that: everyone gets their chance to shine. There is some seriously deep character development here, especially with Aunt May and Mary Jane. Flashbacks contrasted with current events really capture how their relationship with Peter has affected them, and how both him being Spider-man, and ultimately revealing his secret, has changed their lives. Even Felicia Hardy, better known as Black Cat, gets some seriously moving screen time as Peter's estranged ally and ex, and how their break-up and her relapse into criminal activity has changed their relationship and her world outlook. This is a very human graphic novel, and a piece of art that captures the real emotional core of Spider-man better than any other in a long time. Highly recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Evans

    I'm reading this event according to the official Marvel Civil War reading recommendation list as seen on their website here: https://www.marvel.com/comics/discove... This collection is not listed in Marvel's reading list, which makes sense since it deals with more background characters and the repercussions of Peter unmasking. We see how the ladies in Peter's life are impacted, as well as his students and his rivals. I really liked it, but it also doesn't really further the plot of Civil War. This I'm reading this event according to the official Marvel Civil War reading recommendation list as seen on their website here: https://www.marvel.com/comics/discove... This collection is not listed in Marvel's reading list, which makes sense since it deals with more background characters and the repercussions of Peter unmasking. We see how the ladies in Peter's life are impacted, as well as his students and his rivals. I really liked it, but it also doesn't really further the plot of Civil War. This collection is for people who like character-driven stories more than the plot themselves. I would definitely recommend it. For: fans of superheroes/comics; readers wanting a look at more background characters during the Civil War. Possible red flags: characters in peril; violence; implications of sex and sexual situations; language.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Unlike the Spider-Man Civil War volume, this one primarily focused on Peter Parker and the consequences of him revealing his identity. While somewhat interesting, I do have to say it seemed extremely ridiculous that after going out on a limb for registration and Tony Stark, Peter got next to no support or protection from revealing his identity. This also often was redundant after having read the Spider-Man Civil War volume. Worth reading for Spider-Man fans, but honestly, not a highlight of the Unlike the Spider-Man Civil War volume, this one primarily focused on Peter Parker and the consequences of him revealing his identity. While somewhat interesting, I do have to say it seemed extremely ridiculous that after going out on a limb for registration and Tony Stark, Peter got next to no support or protection from revealing his identity. This also often was redundant after having read the Spider-Man Civil War volume. Worth reading for Spider-Man fans, but honestly, not a highlight of the Civil War series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel da boss

    This was an action packed adventure from civil war (comic book version). I enjoyed though I was a bit confused on bits, but I really did enjoy it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    So there was nothing huge happening here, but the stories were still deep and built on deepening the characters and their relationships with each other.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ekrem

    Anything with spiderman in it is worth a 5-star reading for me; and maybe even more if Felicia is in there, as well :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nuno

    A story that's focused on the impact to friends & family of Peter's "coming out" as Spider-Man. I liked the writing, and the art was good if a bit uneven between stories. A story that's focused on the impact to friends & family of Peter's "coming out" as Spider-Man. I liked the writing, and the art was good if a bit uneven between stories.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elliot Huxtable

    The Civil War stories I wanted to read; what do the Spider-Foes do when they find out Peter Parker is their nemesis; what do MJ, Aunt May and the Black Cat make of all this; where was Madame Web?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexson

    The last Black Cat story felt a little forced and corny but the rest of this is a very personal and moving take on different characters in Peters life during the Civil War arc.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    "when things get hopeless, do you know what I do? I go back to that moment, that choice, and I remember: the certainty I felt. The strength I had. We're in a war, Mary Jane. This isn't the time to buckle. It's the time to find out what you're made of. And learn how resilient your love really is." ----Sue Storm

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    It's nice knowing what all the heroes were up to during the Civil War, but this was unnecessary. We know Spidermans arc. Did we really need a comic that has Aunt May trick the Chameleon with cookies while knitting a sweater that says "gotcha"? I think not.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Allen Tyson

    Fun read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Beth Huddleston

    In the Marvel Universe, a war is brewing both political and physical. When a stupid stunt led some young heroes to putting young kids' lives in danger, the country demanded satisfaction. Heroes everywhere needed to be registered. Consequences needed to come with actions. While Captain America believed identities needed to be kept secret, and heroes should have a choice; Iron Man recruited heroes to reveal themselves...heroes like Peter Parker. After Parker took off his mask for the world to see, In the Marvel Universe, a war is brewing both political and physical. When a stupid stunt led some young heroes to putting young kids' lives in danger, the country demanded satisfaction. Heroes everywhere needed to be registered. Consequences needed to come with actions. While Captain America believed identities needed to be kept secret, and heroes should have a choice; Iron Man recruited heroes to reveal themselves...heroes like Peter Parker. After Parker took off his mask for the world to see, repercussions of his decision keep rippling out. Enemies join up to squash the spider and his family. What makes this story novel, though, isn't the man-hunt. We've seen that before. We've seen villains try to hurt Mary Jane or Aunt May too many times to count. This time we see MJ and May's point of view at being exposed and seeing Peter hunted. We see Black Cat furious that the secret is out as well as her willingness to always have the Spider's back. We see the reactions from Parker's students, especially the one who depends on his teacher to get him out of this school and onto higher education. I also particularly enjoyed some of the villains' reactions when they realized that they had fought a teenager for years. Teeheehee.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kaleigh Norkum-Mathieu

    I found the beginning of the book to be a bit tedious, the book being more about how those in Peter Parker's life are adjusting to his coming out as Spiderman. Halfway through the book it started to get a lot more interesting when MJ got her moment to explain her difficulties in supporting her husband through this civil war. I have never been a big MJ fan, I have always like Gwen Stacey and Black Cat more because I found them smart, badass, and capable of taking care of themselves. All traits I I found the beginning of the book to be a bit tedious, the book being more about how those in Peter Parker's life are adjusting to his coming out as Spiderman. Halfway through the book it started to get a lot more interesting when MJ got her moment to explain her difficulties in supporting her husband through this civil war. I have never been a big MJ fan, I have always like Gwen Stacey and Black Cat more because I found them smart, badass, and capable of taking care of themselves. All traits I have never really been able to see with MJ. However, reading through the book and seeing MJ lose her life and an established career as an actress really helped to pull me to the character. I liked seeing her struggles and how this was all affecting her life. I also quite enjoyed reading Aunt May's perspective, and I loved seeing her be able to handle her own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    H

    Worth it if only for Aunt May's story and Felicia Hardy's at the end. Aunt May as a character holds the type of resonance and depth that we feel when we see Martha Kent watching Superman die from her home television set in Kansas. And Felicia Hardy, the Black Cat, is the love story that almost was, which is written here with great emotional surprises. The writing style is fabulous and well-paced. Laughed out loud several times.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Pope

    This was a meh read. The reason that I gave it 3 stars is because out of 6 issues in this TPB collection I only really cared for 3. #28, #32 and #33. The rest didn't hold any impact on me for story telling. (Moment of clarity, this collection feels like it is supposed to be focusing on how Peter's decision is affecting those close to him. Those issues were the best stories that follow that guideline.)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    The story was traditional Spiderman. Modernday swashbuckling hamlet of sorts, although in these stores the inner angst is not as pervasive. Regardless, just as in traditional Spiderman books... you can't help but become enchanted by the story. Even more central is the artistry provided by Clayton Crain, Angel Mediana and Sean Chen. Though stylized, the art is stunning. All the stories carry well, but I truly enjoyed the final story between Black Cat and Spidey. A great addition.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Sensational Spider-Man issues #28-34 This volume takes place in the midst of the "Civil War" event. Spider-Man, after the urging of the Tony Stark, unmasked for the public in the main "Civil War" issues. Now that his secret identity is common knowledge, Peter deals with life as a public superhero. Bad news...some of his villains want to use the new knowledge of Spider-Man's secret identity against him, and the danger to him and his family appears to be stronger than ever.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints Sensational Spider-Man #28-34. Peter, Mary Jane, and Aunt May try to come to terms with Peter's unmasking and face villains seeking him out instead of Spider-Man. The stories in this collection are interesting. It was able to go a little deeper into the (short lived) "unmasking of Spider-Man", and show how Peter's secret affected others.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kenning Jean-Paul García

    The Chameleon and Co. storyline was interesting enough but I think there was too much Black Cat and a completely underused Puma. Aunt May and Mary Jane felt like real characters of importance and Rhino was well done. I wasn't a big fan of Spidey's iron suit suddenly disappearing but all-in-all and based mostly on its conclusion, this chapter in the Civil War saga was the best so far.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    I still don't get Peter Parker coming out as Spider-man. But this book is pretty good if uneven. Actually the Black Cat and Aunt May bits were the best parts. In fact most of this book was people reacting to the news. MJ having coffee with Sue Richards was also pretty good. I guess perhaps the fighting isn't the part I like.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ernest

    Linking well with the overall Civil War storyline, the more the reader knows and followed the various stories within Civil War. Interesting for the most parts, I found myself being less interested with the issues involving the Black Cat and Liz Allen.

  30. 5 out of 5

    heidi

    Did not enjoy this so much. Artwork could have been better. Also didn't help that Black Cat/Felicia Hardy - not my favorite of Spidey's paramours - feature prominently in the story line. That said, great to see Madam Webb for a few panels. Wish there were more of her.

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