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America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history. Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge this nation r America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history. Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge this nation respects: public opinion. At a time of great transition in the news media, "Deadline Artists" celebrates the relevance of the newspaper column through the simple power of excellent writing. It is an inspiration for a new generation of writers--whether their medium is print or digital-looking to learn from the best of their predecessors. Contributors include: Jimmy Breslin, Mike Royko, Murray Kempton, Ernie Pyle, Peggy Noonan, Thomas L. Friedman, David Brooks, Mitch Albom, Dorothy Thompson, Ernest Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, Fanny Fern, Richard Harding Davis, Grantland Rice, Will Rogers, Orson Welles, Langston Hughes, Woody Guthrie, Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken, Ben Hecht, Westbrook Pegler, Heywood Broun, Damon Runyon, W. C. Heinz, Jimmy Cannon, Red Smith, Russell Baker, Art Buchwald, William F. Buckley, Hunter S. Thompson, Pete Dexter, Carl Hiaasen, Dave Barry, Leonard Pitts, Anna Quindlen, Thomas Boswell, Tony Kornheiser, Kathleen Parker, Maureen Dowd, Bob Herbert, Michael Kinsley, Cynthia Tucker, George Will, Jack Newfield, Mike Barnicle, Pete Hamill and Steve Lopez.


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America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history. Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge this nation r America's story has always been best told in its newspapers. From the local and mundane-crime blotters, crop prices, and Sunday sermons-to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in our nation's culture and history. Newspapers in America have always been the crucible where our passions and debates are tried by the only judge this nation respects: public opinion. At a time of great transition in the news media, "Deadline Artists" celebrates the relevance of the newspaper column through the simple power of excellent writing. It is an inspiration for a new generation of writers--whether their medium is print or digital-looking to learn from the best of their predecessors. Contributors include: Jimmy Breslin, Mike Royko, Murray Kempton, Ernie Pyle, Peggy Noonan, Thomas L. Friedman, David Brooks, Mitch Albom, Dorothy Thompson, Ernest Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, Fanny Fern, Richard Harding Davis, Grantland Rice, Will Rogers, Orson Welles, Langston Hughes, Woody Guthrie, Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, H.L. Mencken, Ben Hecht, Westbrook Pegler, Heywood Broun, Damon Runyon, W. C. Heinz, Jimmy Cannon, Red Smith, Russell Baker, Art Buchwald, William F. Buckley, Hunter S. Thompson, Pete Dexter, Carl Hiaasen, Dave Barry, Leonard Pitts, Anna Quindlen, Thomas Boswell, Tony Kornheiser, Kathleen Parker, Maureen Dowd, Bob Herbert, Michael Kinsley, Cynthia Tucker, George Will, Jack Newfield, Mike Barnicle, Pete Hamill and Steve Lopez.

57 review for Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    You didn't ask, but I'll tell you how I know good writing. I savor the words and sentences as I read them. I go back and slowly re-read paragraphs, tasting the language in the same way I slowly enjoy a sip of cabernet or a bite of an Italian beef sandwich, the Chicago kind that drips gardiniere down my arms and onto my shirt. When writing is good, it lingers in the tastebuds of the brain. I usually can't wait to get to the end of a good book. But with the best books, I tend to read in small bites, s You didn't ask, but I'll tell you how I know good writing. I savor the words and sentences as I read them. I go back and slowly re-read paragraphs, tasting the language in the same way I slowly enjoy a sip of cabernet or a bite of an Italian beef sandwich, the Chicago kind that drips gardiniere down my arms and onto my shirt. When writing is good, it lingers in the tastebuds of the brain. I usually can't wait to get to the end of a good book. But with the best books, I tend to read in small bites, stretching out the joy of reading to make it last longer. I've been doing that with "Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns." There are 400 pages in this Overlook Press hardcover, and although I bought it sometime this winter I've just finished the last entry here in June. Yep, it's that good. Okay, maybe it's because I'm a newspaper guy that I've been so taken with this is collection of commentary pieces that appeared in American newspapers over the past 250-plus years, Ben Franklin's from before this country even was this country. But no matter what your life's work, if you want a thorough refresher course in history, if you want to know what Americans have cared about over the years, if you want to get in touch with the spirit and soul of the United States, just read these columns. There's Ernie Pyle writing from the front lines of World War II about "the God-damned infantry," Mary McGrory covering the funeral of JFK, Mitch Albom on a college basketball team you've never heard of and Mike Royko skewering the infamous Picasso that sits (where else?) but in Chicago's Daley Plaza. There's great sports stuff. You can re-read the renown Grantland Rice's piece on the famous Notre Dame football backfield -- you remember, "Outlined against a blue-gray October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again." There's equally famous Red Smith on the '51 Dodgers, the "Miracle of Coogan's Bluff." But there's also intriguing columns about obscure people and events. A guy a never heard of from the LA Times, Bill Plaschke, wrote a beauty of story, one I didn't want to end, about a letter-writer who used to rip him -- and, well, you gotta read that one yourself to find out the ending. Back in 1956, a Southern writer named Harry Golden wrote this hilarious and courageous column satirizing racism in his neck of the woods with an ingenious idea called "The Vertical Negro Plan." The theory? Black people are only a problem for whites when they "set." So his solution to school segregation is to remove all the seats, so that white students don't have to "sit" next to a black student. And that's just the start of Golden's superb commentary piece. There's so much more. There's Art Buchwald and Dave Barry. There's Ernest Hemingway (yeah, he was a newspaper guy) and Dorothy Thompson. There are writers newspaper junkies of a certain age (always wanted to work that phrase into my writing) hold up as heroes, folks like H.L. Mencken, Langstson Hughes, Damon Runyon, Jimmy Breslin, Pete Hamill and so many more. Perhaps the one piece that jumped out at me as the penultimate example of the columnist's art -- superb writing as the clock ticks toward the newspaper's press deadline -- was written by Leonard Pitts Jr. of the Miami Herald, a piece syndicated in newspapers across the country. It was carried in papers on 9/12/2001. It was headlined, "We'll Go Forward From This Moment." It was addressed to the terrorists who brought down the World Trade Center towers. It asked the questions, "What lesson did you hope to teach up by your coward's attack?...What was it you hoped we would learn? Whatever it was, please know that it failed. Did you want us to respect your cause? You just damned your cause. Did you want to make us fear you? You just steeled our resolve. Did you want to tear us apart? You just brought us together." There's more, so much more. In this and in just about every entry. If you savor good writing, treat yourself to a great big serving. But one bite at a time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carissa Peck

    I just began teaching Journalism in 2016. I was a high school journalism nerd, and freelanced a bit while working abroad, but other than having students enter writing contests online I don't have many materials for teaching journalism. This is GREAT. It is basically a collection of amazing articles. Some are pure news, some opinion, others are feature stories. These are great as mentor tasks (and I'd imagine history or social studies teachers would love it too as it covers big events). Perfect add I just began teaching Journalism in 2016. I was a high school journalism nerd, and freelanced a bit while working abroad, but other than having students enter writing contests online I don't have many materials for teaching journalism. This is GREAT. It is basically a collection of amazing articles. Some are pure news, some opinion, others are feature stories. These are great as mentor tasks (and I'd imagine history or social studies teachers would love it too as it covers big events). Perfect addition to any history / journalism / english teacher's classroom (or home because let's face it...my work follows me home!)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Coscia

    Good book to save for rainy days or when researching what great writers had to say about pivotal world events. Mark Twain is here and so is Hunter S. Thompson. The Hemingway column during the Spanish Civil is a hoot. The Big City City columnists (Breslin, Royko, Lopez, Greene, etc.) are fun too. Overall, a wonderful collection of great writing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter William Warn

    Summary: Suspend skepticism. Some readers might have a quibble or two but the volume collects worthwhile columns that certainly are among America's greatest. _____ It has been 75 years since aviation pioneers Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan disappeared mysteriously when their plane went down somewhere in the Pacific. Eloquent words that Walter Lippman crafted for his farewell to Earhart are, sadly, timeless: The world is a better place to live in because it contains human beings who will give up Summary: Suspend skepticism. Some readers might have a quibble or two but the volume collects worthwhile columns that certainly are among America's greatest. _____ It has been 75 years since aviation pioneers Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan disappeared mysteriously when their plane went down somewhere in the Pacific. Eloquent words that Walter Lippman crafted for his farewell to Earhart are, sadly, timeless: The world is a better place to live in because it contains human beings who will give up ease and security and stake their own lives in order to do what they themselves think worth doing. They help to offset the much larger number who are ready to sacrifice the ease and the security and the very lives of others in order to accomplish what they want done. Of people like Earhart, Lippmann concluded : No preconceived theory fits them. No material purpose actuates them. They do the useless, brave, noble, the divinely foolish and the very wisest things that are done by man. And what they prove to themselves and to others is that man is no mere creature of his habits, no more automaton in his routine, no mere cog in the collective machine, but that in the dust of which he is made there is also fire, lighted now and then by great winds from the sky. With his elegant prose and inspiring insight, Lippmann did what all great newspaper columnists do in their own ways. Their reporting and commentary inform us. Powerful columns can move us to take action. They make us think, laugh or cry. Columnists put their subjects in larger contexts to help us understand ourselves and our world. They shine spotlights on specifics to illuminate the universal. Deadline Artists: America's Greatest Newspaper Columns, edited by John Avlon of Newsweek, Jesse Angelo of The New York Post and Errol Louis of NY1 News, collects 168 extraordinary pieces by the best columnists, some working today and others as far back as the 19th century. Featured writers are familiar to readers now (Peggy Noonan, Pete Hamill, Anna Quindlen) while some were more familiar to our parents, grandparents or great-grandparents (William Allen White, H.L. Mencken, Grantland Rice). Many of the columnists won Pulitzer Prizes and many others deserve to. Some are known more for their fiction (Mark Twain, Damon Runyon, Langston Hughes), their political/social achievements (Frederick Douglass, Theodore Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt) or their larger-than-life personalities (Will Rogers, Woodie Guthrie, Ernest Hemingway). Some of the entries in Deadline Artists (2012, The Overlook Press) were published first in papers that shape our understandings still (The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal). Others were presented in periodicals that have long been silent (The New York World, The Washington Star, The Chicago Daily News). Most of the columns fit on a page or two but a few, deservedly, stretch out for a half-dozen. Some of the columns are serious. Jimmy Breslin becomes part of the story when the the serial killer known as the Son of Sam sends him a letter and Breslin urges the man to surrender: "The hope is that the killer realizes he is controlled by Sam, who not only forces him into acts of horror but will ultimately walk him to his death." Murray Kempton eulogizes victims of racial violence: "It cannot be counted among the least of the South's sorrows that she and her brothers and sisters have been parted from the best and kindest friends not their blood that they ever had." After the attacks of 9/11, Thomas L. Friedman found inspiration in the contrast between the monomania of the terrorists and the varied outlooks and attitudes of the people who attended a parents' conference at his daughter's school in Maryland: Which is why the terrorists can hijack Boeing planes, but in the spiritless, monolithic societies they want to build, they could never produce them. The terrorists can exploit the U.S.-made Internet, but in their suffocated world of one God, one truth, one way, one leader, they could never invent it. . . . Actually our strength lies in the slightly dilapidated gym of Eastern Middle School on parent-teacher night, and in the thousands of such schools across the land. That is where you'll find the spirit that built the twin towers and can build them over again anytime we please. Some columns are touching. Erma Bombeck imagines God responding to an angel who says that He is making a father's hands very big: "I know, but they're large enough to hold everything a small boy empties from his pockets at the end of a day, yet small enough to cup a child's face." In his reflection on the deaths of his parents, George F. Will, identifies a "stern paradox: Families seared by a loved one's dementia face the challenges of forgetting. They must choose to achieve what dementia inflicts on its victims--short-term memory loss. They must restore to the foreground of remembrance the older memories of vivacity and wit." Kathleen Parker recalls an English teacher who saved her from humiliation with a compliment after she'd made a mistake in front of the class: It is not possible to describe my gratitude. Time suspended and I dangled langorously from a fluff of clouds while my colleagues drowned in stunned silence. I dangle even now, like those silly participles I eventually got to know. Likely no one but me remembers Mr. Gasque's act of paternal chivalry, but I basked in those words and in the thought that what he said might be true. I started that day to try to write as well as he said I could. I am still trying. Some columns are funny. In "Pithy into the Wind" Dave Barry is subversively frank about his desire to win a journalism prize. Tony Kornheiser engages in such gleeful, relentless French-bashing that his "Pardon my French" can enrage even casual Francophiles, until he turns at the end and . . . you wouldn't appreciate my spoiling it. In "Spring Before Swine," Russell Baker reflects on the Fourth Estate: Because of all the morbid interest in the press these days, I am often asked what is the most disagreeable aspect of the journalist's trade. At one time my answer would have been "covering the Thanksgiving Day parade," a chore that can forever maim the spirit of any person not easily moved to superlatives by vast quantities of inflated rubber. Later I amended this judment after being sent to work in Washington. There the journalistic code required "objectivity," which forbade a reporter to write of, say, Senator Blattis: "Lying as usual, Senator Blattis declared today . . . ." Editors Avlon, Angelo and Louis introduce columns by others with prose that reflects their own gifts. They preface the section on war reporting with the conclusion that the "best columns filed from a combat zone bring out the humanity obscured by the savagery of war." Crime columnists "record the grisly body counts but do it with so much flair that at times they almost seem to be having fun." Columns about baseball and boxing dominate the sports section: Maybe it's because baseball lends itself to literature with its contemplative pace. It has been called a haunted game, where current players are always compared to the best of those who came before them, stat by stat. Boxing offers all the drama a writer could ask for--physical conflict where the best man wins. It is a sport custom-made for the columnist, who can detail the action in the ring while casting the human context in a larger arena. No one will agree with everything in Deadline Artists. Anyone can be enriched by it. _____ A relevant recent New Yorker cartoon: Three Doric columns dominate a living room. A dog is curled up on one. A woman stands on another and a man on the third. He says, "You knew I was a columnist when you married me."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Molly A.

    A bit uneven and several columnists seem to reappear repeatedly. I really enjoyed being exposed to the historic columns of Twain, Hemingway, Ernie Pyle, and the like. however, I thought the thematic organization weak and left me scratching my head about the selection.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob Mentzer

    I am reading this to try and get better at writing my own columns. Man, there are some good ones.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Some excellent columns. I like the way the editors organized the book--by subject (war, politics, sports, humor, crime, and so on) and then chronologically. Unfortunately, this book is full of typos.

  8. 5 out of 5

    E.

    Off and on for the last three years this has been my downstairs-bathroom-reading. A delightful and informative collection of great newspaper columns that illustrates the artistry of this genre. Two I have remembered most. One by Charles McDowell in which he wrote about the day that Nixon resigned and how normal it was for most people. That column is a powerful statement of the strength of our Republic. And the other is Jimmy Breslin's column about Parkland Hospital on the day that JFK was assass Off and on for the last three years this has been my downstairs-bathroom-reading. A delightful and informative collection of great newspaper columns that illustrates the artistry of this genre. Two I have remembered most. One by Charles McDowell in which he wrote about the day that Nixon resigned and how normal it was for most people. That column is a powerful statement of the strength of our Republic. And the other is Jimmy Breslin's column about Parkland Hospital on the day that JFK was assassinated. Both columns tell the story of major events by looking at minor characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Delia Cabe

    I use this book in my column writing class. I can introduce students to history while teaching the various forms of the genre of column writing. I wish the columns represented a more diverse group, but I suspect that is due to the fact that white men predominated throughout journalism's history. I supplement this text with contemporary columns that represent a diverse group of writers to balance the book out. I use this book in my column writing class. I can introduce students to history while teaching the various forms of the genre of column writing. I wish the columns represented a more diverse group, but I suspect that is due to the fact that white men predominated throughout journalism's history. I supplement this text with contemporary columns that represent a diverse group of writers to balance the book out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindalee

    An interesting look at history through the eyes of newspaper columnists. It was not a book that I could read straight through, but I read a few columns every day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    A true American part of life; millions is exposed every day to a much admired piece of “art”. Giving people the ability to receive the latest news, be informed, and kept intrigued by some of the most influential moments in history written by some of the most influential writers of history. Deadline Artists: Anthology of America’s greatest newspaper columns is a collection of some of the most famous newspaper articles written in the history of America. This book features them all in one book givi A true American part of life; millions is exposed every day to a much admired piece of “art”. Giving people the ability to receive the latest news, be informed, and kept intrigued by some of the most influential moments in history written by some of the most influential writers of history. Deadline Artists: Anthology of America’s greatest newspaper columns is a collection of some of the most famous newspaper articles written in the history of America. This book features them all in one book giving the ability for past and present day history to be brought together. The book organizes and categorizes the articles in such a way to capture the essence of good journalism. A variety of superb writing ranges from love, death, happiness, and tragedy. Articles like, “The Cinderella Man” by Damon Runyon and “Mussolini’s Tough Guys” by Westbrook Pegler, capture some of history’s most important events and bringing them back to life as you read their writing. The writing styles vary and differ article to article giving you a small taste of many wonderful writers from several time periods. For example, the article, “The Murder of President Lincoln” by Noah Brooks, has a much different flavor written in 1865, with differences in the language compared to, “Son of Sam: Fear in Queens” by Jimmy Breslin written in 1977. Mark Twain, Theodore Roosevelt, Dorothy Thompson, Ernest Hemmingway, Peggy Noonan, David Brooks, and many more famous and admired writers are featured in the book. Timeless and inspirational pieces from some of the best writers yet. All of these monumental people brought together in one book. Easy to enjoy and get a glance of America through time. Anyone wanting to enjoy some American history and intriguing writing should take a look at this book. It gives you the privilege of having these great articles in one book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I read the op-ed pieces and columns in the Washington Post on a daily basis and in every other newspaper and magazine that I open. I enjoy the format – a writer’s unique take on an issue, generally on a current topic. The topics vary widely – politics, international events, sports, “human interest” stories and more. I think the medium is a challenging one for writers – to say something unique with an angle that had been unexplored, to report a happening in a compelling fashion that grabs the rea I read the op-ed pieces and columns in the Washington Post on a daily basis and in every other newspaper and magazine that I open. I enjoy the format – a writer’s unique take on an issue, generally on a current topic. The topics vary widely – politics, international events, sports, “human interest” stories and more. I think the medium is a challenging one for writers – to say something unique with an angle that had been unexplored, to report a happening in a compelling fashion that grabs the reader’s attention, to provide new insights into a story that is part of the current news. And to write it quickly on deadline! In this book 130 such columns were selected and compiled by three editors and organized into 3 general groups –scandals, tragedies and triumphs. The columns included in each section are presented in chronological order and cover many decades. As one would expect, not every column is going to be equally appealing to any one person. I found many really compelling – both the content and the writing. I found many “routine.” I found a few that I personally would not have included in such an anthology. But I definitely found the book worth-while reading. These true stories provide a broad sweep of what was on the minds of Americans during these times. I was left with one confounding question however: why were the columns on the dropping of the Atomic bomb on Nagasaki and another of a bombing a small Japanese town at (actually after) the conclusion of the war included in the section “Triumphs”?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Geri Spieler

    In a world of perishable correspondence, I fear we will lose precious writings to the Internet. Some would argue that the electronic world allows us to save writing in perpetuity unlike in the physical world. I hope so. Then we can accumulate such writings as we have in this journalistic candy store of Deadline Artists: Scandals, Tragedies and Triumphs—More of America’s Greatest Newspaper Columns. The book is written in the form of an anthology with contributors that include H. L. Mencken, Will Ro In a world of perishable correspondence, I fear we will lose precious writings to the Internet. Some would argue that the electronic world allows us to save writing in perpetuity unlike in the physical world. I hope so. Then we can accumulate such writings as we have in this journalistic candy store of Deadline Artists: Scandals, Tragedies and Triumphs—More of America’s Greatest Newspaper Columns. The book is written in the form of an anthology with contributors that include H. L. Mencken, Will Rogers, Jimmy Breslin, Art Buchwald, William F. Buckley Jr., Molly Ivins, Ernest Hemingway, Maureen Dowd, Nora Ephron, Carl Hiaasen, Walter Lippmann, George Will, Mike Ryoko, Dorothy Thompson, Richard Wright, Damon Runyon, Peggy Noonan, Mike Barnicle, and more. All are icons of the great world of newspaper columnists that brought a rich reflection on the sign of the times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean Curry

    Interesting read, a present from my dad for Christmas. Selections of newspaper columns from the last few centuries of American columnists. I'll pick it up and read a few every now and again. I obviously loved the Humor section, it's fascinating how good humor can retain its relevance and sharpness even over a century after its publishing. Mark Twain is as funny today as he was in his time. What surprises me about this book is how good writing holds up even long after its subject matter ceases to Interesting read, a present from my dad for Christmas. Selections of newspaper columns from the last few centuries of American columnists. I'll pick it up and read a few every now and again. I obviously loved the Humor section, it's fascinating how good humor can retain its relevance and sharpness even over a century after its publishing. Mark Twain is as funny today as he was in his time. What surprises me about this book is how good writing holds up even long after its subject matter ceases to matter. The Crime chapter, the Politics chapter, even the Sports chapter all still enthrall me, even as the events being described don't ring any bells. I didn't expect a column about on a police raid on an illegal whiskey operation in the 1920s would have me so enraptured today in 2012. Good writing stands the test of time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    The subtitle says it all. This is really a tremendous collection. In addition to just excellent writing it's organized in a manner that really makes it accessible and enhances the enjoyment. The chapters are topical and within each chapter the columns are arranged chronologically so it provides a really nice historical perspective on the various topics. I was re-acquainted with columnist old friends I've missed since they passed or stopped publishing. I was introduced to some wonderful writers f The subtitle says it all. This is really a tremendous collection. In addition to just excellent writing it's organized in a manner that really makes it accessible and enhances the enjoyment. The chapters are topical and within each chapter the columns are arranged chronologically so it provides a really nice historical perspective on the various topics. I was re-acquainted with columnist old friends I've missed since they passed or stopped publishing. I was introduced to some wonderful writers from bygone eras (some of the columns date back to the late 19th century). I was reminded of why I so enjoy some of today's columnists. The variety of writers, topics, styles, and eras makes this a really richly rewarding read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David

    I didn't realize this was a volume 2 until I had already dived in. Doesn't matter which order you read them in, but I'm already on the hunt for volume 1. This was a enjoyable way to end the night. Quick and informative reads that give you a real-time look at some of our most compelling historic moments. Among my favorite entries. The Alabama Literacy Best by Art Buchwald You Can Bet on Sinatra by Mike Royko A Child Wrestles with his Dog's Death by Pete Dexter Going so Fast, Gone too Soon by Mitch A I didn't realize this was a volume 2 until I had already dived in. Doesn't matter which order you read them in, but I'm already on the hunt for volume 1. This was a enjoyable way to end the night. Quick and informative reads that give you a real-time look at some of our most compelling historic moments. Among my favorite entries. The Alabama Literacy Best by Art Buchwald You Can Bet on Sinatra by Mike Royko A Child Wrestles with his Dog's Death by Pete Dexter Going so Fast, Gone too Soon by Mitch Albom Jackie's Debut by Mike Royko The Last Lecture by Jeffrey Zaslow

  17. 5 out of 5

    Normalene

    There is so much I could say about this book. I didn't read it cover to cover but read each entry in each section according to its place in history. It gives you a perspective you might not see otherwise. All I would like to do is to repeat a quote from Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) which perfectly expresses my sad/happy feelings: Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean. Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, In looking on the happy autumn fie There is so much I could say about this book. I didn't read it cover to cover but read each entry in each section according to its place in history. It gives you a perspective you might not see otherwise. All I would like to do is to repeat a quote from Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) which perfectly expresses my sad/happy feelings: Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean. Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes, In looking on the happy autumn fields, And thinking of the days that are no more.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Hoff

    Great compilation of editorials across time; organized by topic. It is fascinating to see how rhetoric changes (and in some instances remains the same!) regarding issues as we have developed as a country. This isn't a book to just read right through. I picked a topic, read that section a little at a time; and then moved on. Amazing writers; important insights. I will re-read some of these columns time and again. Great compilation of editorials across time; organized by topic. It is fascinating to see how rhetoric changes (and in some instances remains the same!) regarding issues as we have developed as a country. This isn't a book to just read right through. I picked a topic, read that section a little at a time; and then moved on. Amazing writers; important insights. I will re-read some of these columns time and again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Less enjoyable than the first volume, mainly because of the subject matter. I did not like the Scandals section at all. But there were some really good columns in the Tragedy and Triumph sections. Read it only after you read the first volume, because if you start with this you might not be inspired to read the other one. But in any case, this is a great way to get eyewitness perspectives on history from gifted writers.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Excellent anthology. Reading new (to me) work by my favorite critic, John Leonard, was a pleasant surprise. I spent most of my time both reading and underlining all the gems and golden nuggets. Plus, it is one of those novels that really moves you to read aloud. A new favorite.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Gives great snapshots into historic events.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This is a book you will want to revisit again and again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Excellent!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    A Christmas present from my youngest daughter who heard about it on CNN. An article picked at random was quite good

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marfy

    Excellent articles in this book. Makes one nostalgic for the great days of newspapers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Janice Ellis

    What an excellent compilation of some of the best newspaper columnists. This book illustrates the important role that thoughtful, fact-based analysis of events and issues play in helping the public to have an informed opinion of policy decisions that are important to their quality of life. We need more thoughtful and balanced commentary more than ever in today's political environment. What an excellent compilation of some of the best newspaper columnists. This book illustrates the important role that thoughtful, fact-based analysis of events and issues play in helping the public to have an informed opinion of policy decisions that are important to their quality of life. We need more thoughtful and balanced commentary more than ever in today's political environment.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Collison

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tom Norton

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  32. 4 out of 5

    Quentin

  33. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Jones

  34. 5 out of 5

    Margery

  35. 5 out of 5

    Shawn O'Rourke

  36. 5 out of 5

    indigo583

  37. 4 out of 5

    Marc A.

  38. 4 out of 5

    helen

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  40. 4 out of 5

    Kira

  41. 4 out of 5

    Gil

  42. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  43. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Rose

  44. 5 out of 5

    Mary Kristine

  45. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

  46. 5 out of 5

    Devika Koppikar

  47. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  48. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  49. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  50. 4 out of 5

    Catie

  51. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  52. 5 out of 5

    IKe Tanasinteerachart

  53. 5 out of 5

    Gineane

  54. 5 out of 5

    Annita

  55. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

  56. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  57. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

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