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In the wake of a shattered alliance, the New Republic fights a relentlessnew enemy in an all-new adventure in the bestselling "Star Wars" saga...Faced with an alarming image of Han as a battered hostage of the Yevetha, Chewbacca takes on an urgent mission. Meanwhile, Leia calls upon the Senate totake a stand and eliminate the Yevetha threat--even at the cost of Han's life. In the wake of a shattered alliance, the New Republic fights a relentlessnew enemy in an all-new adventure in the bestselling "Star Wars" saga...Faced with an alarming image of Han as a battered hostage of the Yevetha, Chewbacca takes on an urgent mission. Meanwhile, Leia calls upon the Senate totake a stand and eliminate the Yevetha threat--even at the cost of Han's life.As a former Imperial governor takes his battle to the runaway Qella spaceship, Luke's continuing search for his mother brings him dangerously close to NilSpaar's deadly forces. And as the Yevetha close in on the forces of the NewRepublic, Luke takes a desperate gamble with an invisible weapon...


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In the wake of a shattered alliance, the New Republic fights a relentlessnew enemy in an all-new adventure in the bestselling "Star Wars" saga...Faced with an alarming image of Han as a battered hostage of the Yevetha, Chewbacca takes on an urgent mission. Meanwhile, Leia calls upon the Senate totake a stand and eliminate the Yevetha threat--even at the cost of Han's life. In the wake of a shattered alliance, the New Republic fights a relentlessnew enemy in an all-new adventure in the bestselling "Star Wars" saga...Faced with an alarming image of Han as a battered hostage of the Yevetha, Chewbacca takes on an urgent mission. Meanwhile, Leia calls upon the Senate totake a stand and eliminate the Yevetha threat--even at the cost of Han's life.As a former Imperial governor takes his battle to the runaway Qella spaceship, Luke's continuing search for his mother brings him dangerously close to NilSpaar's deadly forces. And as the Yevetha close in on the forces of the NewRepublic, Luke takes a desperate gamble with an invisible weapon...

30 review for Tyrant's Test

  1. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    "What has this all been about?" The crisis with the Koornacht cluster is on the brink of war. Leia's position as president is in turmoil and Han has been captured. Meanwhile, Lando and team are on the cusp of discovery and Luke is growing closer to finding the Fallanassi. I Liked: Kube-McDowell saves this series with the political machinations between the New Republic and the Yevetha. Leia is forced to choose between her tenure as president and her husband. This decision is tough and ugly, but it i "What has this all been about?" The crisis with the Koornacht cluster is on the brink of war. Leia's position as president is in turmoil and Han has been captured. Meanwhile, Lando and team are on the cusp of discovery and Luke is growing closer to finding the Fallanassi. I Liked: Kube-McDowell saves this series with the political machinations between the New Republic and the Yevetha. Leia is forced to choose between her tenure as president and her husband. This decision is tough and ugly, but it is realistic, and I appreciate an author who isn't afraid of putting an unhappy solution in a novel. Lando's mission reaches an interesting climax when Lobot interfaces with the Vagabond, though I would be lying if I said I enjoyed the resolution of this plot line. In the previous two reviews, I have been exceedingly critical of MKM, but I think he deserves credit for elevating Chewbacca above the sidekick role. Here, we get to see his family, how he behaves with his son, and his rescue of Han, one of the best things Chewbacca has ever done in the series. I Didn't Like: I can't help but echo Luke's thoughts: What has this [trilogy:] all been about? Why do we care about these missions, these crisis, these journeys? They bear no relevance on later books, they have no lasting impact. To illustrate, let me take the major plot lines: Lando: So Lando learns the secret of the ship, but he and Luke, who comes whizzing to the rescue at the end in the only plausible tie-in to the rest of the trilogy, won't see any results of this three book long quest, because it takes 100 years for their efforts to "bloom". Wow, and why again was this mission so important that we needed to shoe horn it in with the Yevetha crisis? Leia: So Leia's presidency is challenged and she declares war on the Yevetha. This could be the beginning of an amazing series...but it is promptly wrapped up with the appearance of Luke and the Omnipotent, Amazing, Peaceful, Wonderful, Godly Fallanassi. Thanks, MKM, for destroying a good story. You put us through one book that barely begins the conflict (I guess that's why it was called Before the Storm, yuk, yuk), another book that steadily rises the conflict to the next level, then rapidly, and hastily wraps it up in the last one. Talk about a waste of effort! Luke: His whole reason for leaving Yavin 4 was supposed to be because he needed to be a hermit. But that lasted all of one chapter, for he spent the rest of the trilogy with Akanah, the worst girlfriend he has ever had (and proof positive that he is a diehard submissive). The most distrusting, untrustworthy, dishonest, deceitful, manipulative, oppressive, and demanding woman that supposedly was a "good guy" (Uh, huh, yeah, you really bought me on that one--not) proves her integrity by lying with Luke to get him to tag along with her. And I really don't know why. She found all the "clues" (i.e. big, huge, obvious arrow signs) and refused to listen to any of Luke's advise, resting solely on her "vastly superior" knowledge of this previously unknown force, the White Current. It is my personal belief that she is on drugs and what she sees during her psychedelic mind trips is the White Current. So, we (and Luke) trudge through this, supposedly to learn more about Luke's mom (which, those of us who have seen the prequels, know won't happen) only to come out with absolutely nothing. Luke returns to Leia with the always insightful knowledge that he ought to spend time with family. God, and we had to read three books with the worst chemistry, the worst female character ever to come out with this gem??? All in all, the only things we've come out through this tripe are the following: 1) Tie-ins with the most derided SW EU media, the Star Wars holiday special 2) Luke learning the value of family (cue sappy music) 3) Lumpawarrump becoming a man and killing his parents for giving him such a God-awful name. Wow, I so couldn't live without that. I've lambasted the plot and the characters (specifically Leia, Luke, and Akanah) to no end, but there is one thing I've forgot to mention in my reviews to the previous two books: Nil Spaar and the Yevetha. While there were some good aspects, I felt on a whole, they were just an excuse for an enemy, one that had absolutely no redeeming value (to human morality), so they could be wholesale slaughtered and no one would bat an eye. I never once sympathized with the villains or felt anything beyond disgust and revulsion. Even the Yuuzhan Vong from the New Jedi Order were better done. I could feel sympathy for Nen Yim and Mezhan Kwad, even for Tsvong Lah. Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: Little to none. Akanah and Luke share a room. The violence in this one is pretty darn heavy. Nil Spaar kills someone so violently, his head is severed. Han is brutally beat to a pulp and people think he is dead. The entire Yevetha society considers murder only a crime if a lower-caste member kills an upper-class member. Overall: Political intrigue aside, there really is no reason to read this series. Want a real threat to the New Republic that doesn't deal with the Empire? Go to the New Jedi Order. Want political intrigue? Try Cloak of Deception or Specter of the Past. Want to see Luke learn about his family? Er, guess you will have to keep waiting (Leia finds out about her dad, though, in Tatooine Ghost. Follow Obi-Wan's advice and just "Move along. Move along."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    I really wanted to give this four stars, but the last hundred pages failed to pay off the build up of the preceding thousand. The only-tenuous connection of the "Lando thread" to the rest of the story and the inadequate resolution of the Han's and Luke's threads weighted down the otherwise excellent story telling. It wasn't Kube-McDowell's fault that he wrote this before Episodes One, Two and Three movies were shown, but even so he kept the story within the bounds of "orthodoxy." But how did the E I really wanted to give this four stars, but the last hundred pages failed to pay off the build up of the preceding thousand. The only-tenuous connection of the "Lando thread" to the rest of the story and the inadequate resolution of the Han's and Luke's threads weighted down the otherwise excellent story telling. It wasn't Kube-McDowell's fault that he wrote this before Episodes One, Two and Three movies were shown, but even so he kept the story within the bounds of "orthodoxy." But how did the Empire find the White Circle if they could hide so well from everyone else?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    "Tyrant's Test" is the third and final book in Michael P. Kube-McDowell's Black Fleet Crisis series. Highly enjoyable, fast-paced, and written with intelligence and respect for the Star Wars universe and characters created by George Lucas, this series is a must-read for Star Wars fans. In this one, Leia makes a tough but necessary decision as President of the New Republic in the war against the Yevethans. Meanwhile, Chewbacca, and several of his Wookie relatives including his son, Lumpy, decide "Tyrant's Test" is the third and final book in Michael P. Kube-McDowell's Black Fleet Crisis series. Highly enjoyable, fast-paced, and written with intelligence and respect for the Star Wars universe and characters created by George Lucas, this series is a must-read for Star Wars fans. In this one, Leia makes a tough but necessary decision as President of the New Republic in the war against the Yevethans. Meanwhile, Chewbacca, and several of his Wookie relatives including his son, Lumpy, decide to make a dangerous attempt at a rescue mission to save Han from the Yevethans. Also meanwhile, Luke discovers Akanah's secrets, which may be used as a secret weapon against the Yevethans, if she agrees to it. Also also meanwhile, Lando and the droids, still stuck on the vagabond ship, discover its real purpose as it arrives at a seemingly long-dead planet that still harbors life deep beneath its frozen surface. Bravo, Mr. Kube-McDowell!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kurtbg

    The final book in this trilogy among a trillion of trilogies in the SW universe. There’s some good story, but tries to do too much by weaving four story lines and trying to give the main characters all something. The establish Lucas paradigm is to have three story lines to pull at each other to build drama.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    "Tyrant's Test" is the third book of a Star Wars trilogy written by Michael P. Kube-McDowell. According to the "About the Author" page, this is actually the pen name of Michael Paul McDowell. I understand why authors use different pen names to keep from being typecast with a certain genre but I'm not sure how they came up with the mouthfull for this one. Oh well. This trilogy take place about twelve years after the "Return of the Jedi" and was written in the still early days of the first group o "Tyrant's Test" is the third book of a Star Wars trilogy written by Michael P. Kube-McDowell. According to the "About the Author" page, this is actually the pen name of Michael Paul McDowell. I understand why authors use different pen names to keep from being typecast with a certain genre but I'm not sure how they came up with the mouthfull for this one. Oh well. This trilogy take place about twelve years after the "Return of the Jedi" and was written in the still early days of the first group of Star Wars fiction. Consequently, it suffers, I believe with having to rely on plot development, filling in the "what happened next" syndrome and just doesn't have to time to really expand on the characters. Most of us know a lot about Luke, Leia, Han, Chewbacca, Lando, etc. but do we really? The plot of this one is fairly straight forward. Each of the main characters I just mentioned plus some bad guys have their own sub plots and that's really too many to fully develop in a 350 page paperback book, especially when all of the sub plots need to be wrapped up. I thought Luke's plot was especially contrived because it turned out he was just being lied to the whole time and nothing came of it. But somehow at the end, that experience had substantially changed him and his outlook. Hmmm... Han didn't play a big role throughout the trilogy, just uncharacteristically being captured and having to be rescued. Didn't ring true. All in all, this trilogy has some of the worst reviews I've seen for SW books. It wasn't that bad in my opinion but still, I am glad to see it come to an end.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Darryl Dobbs

    Closing off the trilogy, the third book was as riveting as the others. That is to say - for the Han and Leia parts I was riveted, but the other parts not so much. The Luke area never really got going for me, not only because Akanah Pell (his lady friend) is annoying, but their search for her people (and his mother) was a pretty boring one. I've also made no effort to hide the fact that the only magic I enjoy in this series is the Force. Akanah uses the 'Current' and they apparently have the abil Closing off the trilogy, the third book was as riveting as the others. That is to say - for the Han and Leia parts I was riveted, but the other parts not so much. The Luke area never really got going for me, not only because Akanah Pell (his lady friend) is annoying, but their search for her people (and his mother) was a pretty boring one. I've also made no effort to hide the fact that the only magic I enjoy in this series is the Force. Akanah uses the 'Current' and they apparently have the ability to hide items as large as spaceships and create illusions that are just as big. One good thing to come out of it though is that now Luke has that added ability (invisibility) which he was taught. This storyline did eventually tie into the Han and Leia tangent. So it had a point. That's something that can't be said about the Lando plotline. Pointless. The story got worse as it went on. And in the end it had nothing at all to do with the other story threads. Besides the interesting Han and Leia story, I also enjoyed the Chewbacca tangent. He caught wind of Han being captured by the enemy and he immediately dropped everything to go rescue him. It was good enough to salvage a novel that Lando's 'adventures' almost ruined.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This book stunk!!! It was well written, but the plot and story line stunk. I had the first 2 books as 4 stars because I thought well not that great it was still better then some of the other Star Wars books. But reading this book moved them to 2 stars and this one gets a 1 star. The ending was lame and really disappointing. The only thing that was good was Chewie kicking butt. Everything had to go. The author should have saved the readers time and money and gotten rid of the Luke and Lando storie This book stunk!!! It was well written, but the plot and story line stunk. I had the first 2 books as 4 stars because I thought well not that great it was still better then some of the other Star Wars books. But reading this book moved them to 2 stars and this one gets a 1 star. The ending was lame and really disappointing. The only thing that was good was Chewie kicking butt. Everything had to go. The author should have saved the readers time and money and gotten rid of the Luke and Lando stories and it would have been 1 book. They really didn't have anything to do with the overall story and it was a waste. Leia wasn't mentioned in the last 100+ pages and her character had some serious things going on. I am super glad I bought these books used and a total of less then $7 combined. I should have listened to one of my friends on this site and skipped it. I don't recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Colin McEvoy

    I basically feel about Tyrant’s Test the way I feel about the entire Black Fleet Crisis series: not without flaws, and there are certain aspects of the story I would have handled differently, but overall it was enjoyable enough and there’s more that I liked than there is that I didn’t. So let me focus first on what I liked. There have essentially been three major subplots throughout this series: Lando Calrissian investigating (and being trapped upon) a mysterious phantom spacecraft, Luke Skywalke I basically feel about Tyrant’s Test the way I feel about the entire Black Fleet Crisis series: not without flaws, and there are certain aspects of the story I would have handled differently, but overall it was enjoyable enough and there’s more that I liked than there is that I didn’t. So let me focus first on what I liked. There have essentially been three major subplots throughout this series: Lando Calrissian investigating (and being trapped upon) a mysterious phantom spacecraft, Luke Skywalker travelling with a mysterious woman and trying to learn about his long-lost mother, and Princess Leia trying to grapple with the threat of both the evil Yevethan species, as well as political foes attempting to remove her from power, not to mention the kidnapping of her husband Han Solo. Throughout the series, Princess Leia’s chapters have been the most interesting to me, while Luke’s subplot has been the least interesting, and indeed, I thought Leia’s story arc wrapped up nicely in Tyrant’s Test. While in the first book of this series I found that author Michael P. Kobe-McDowell had made her character far too uncertain and weak-willed, in this final novel she seems much more like the Leia we all know and love. In the face of moral dilemma over whether to do what she believes is right for the New Republic or to throw that all aside to save her husband’s life, the way she ultimately handles that decision feels truly in character for her, and it is a triumphant moment. (And it was nice to see Mon Mothma reemerge in a chapter to provide her some morale support!) What surprised me, however, was how much I enjoyed Luke’s storyline in this one as well. For the first two books (and especially the second one), I found myself extremely uninterested, and felt that Kobe-McDowell (as with Leia in the first book) handled Luke’s character and personality entirely incorrectly in the second novel. In Tyrant’s Test, however, he took what had previously seemed to me to be an unnecessary tangent from the main storyline and tied it surprisingly well back into the book’s major conflict with the Yevetha. The Luke B-plot didn’t sustain my interest for most of the series, but it won me back in a big way here. On the flip side, the Lando subplot, which I have otherwise enjoyed for most of the season, kind of sputtered into its final chapters. The surprise revelation of what exactly this ship is was not a bad one in and of itself, but I was surprised that it ultimately had nothing to do with the main plotline of the series. The Luke story seemed that way for the first two books as well, but it ultimately tied back into it. Lando’s story never did. As with the other books, I also enjoyed the Yevetha (and especially its leader, Nil Spaar) as an antagonist, but I was disappointed with how the conflict between the Yevetha and New Republic came to an end. After three books of developing this species’ culture and building up to a war between the two, they are ultimately felled in large part due to an unexpected betrayal by a character who had not even appeared in the series until the very end. It felt very unrewarding and a bit like a deus ex machina. But again, there was enough to enjoy in Tyrant’s Test to let me forgive its shortcomings. We also get Chewbacca back in the fold, after he had gone missing since the first book, and his side quest to recapture Han Solo along with fellow Wookie family members is good fun, not to mention a nice little coming-of-age story for Chewie’s son, Lumpawaroo. And Kobe-McDowell does a good job of developing little minor characters who will never be seen again after this series and making us root for them all the same, like Esege Tuketu and Skids (a pilot and bomber duo who we first saw in the first chapter of the first book, and who play a brief but important role in ths one) and Plat Millar (the sole survivor of a deadly Yevethan raid who becomes a New Republic pilot and is desperate to contribute to strike a blow against them). So yeah, in the end, Tyrant’s Test and the Black Fleet Crisis may not be the best Star Wars books around, but if you like Star Wars books, you’ll probably like them.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erik Akre

    Hey! A Star Wars novel written with genuine skill! Kube-McDowell did things right compared to other writers in the vast miasma of Star Wars books. Here are two of them that stick with me: He has an absolutely amazing handle on Star Wars technical information--way more than his readers can possibly have. The effect is that he draws the read on through the great lexicon of starships and gadgets and technological realities of the Universe. The reader understands maybe two-thirds of it at most, but th Hey! A Star Wars novel written with genuine skill! Kube-McDowell did things right compared to other writers in the vast miasma of Star Wars books. Here are two of them that stick with me: He has an absolutely amazing handle on Star Wars technical information--way more than his readers can possibly have. The effect is that he draws the read on through the great lexicon of starships and gadgets and technological realities of the Universe. The reader understands maybe two-thirds of it at most, but the reader ends up completely trusting the author. We are in good hands here, and we can settle in to a well-executed description of the book's world. And character! Kube-McDowell's treatment of the familiar and unfamiliar characters goes at least somewhat beneath the surface, which is more than one can say about many of the other books. The author is skilled especially at dialogue--another rare feat among these novels--and the plot, which relies so heavily on the characters talking to each other, becomes clearer, easier to follow, more enjoyable, and better driven. Although the attempt to tell several threads of plot at once becomes a little distracting and feels disjointed, despite the fact that they (mostly? anti-climactically?) come together in the end, this book is solid. I read it stand-alone, as a simple diversion from my real life, and now I'm interested in digging in to the rest of the series. Especially if its written by the same author.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I feel like some of this story is the "I have this great idea" and then work backwards to make it work problem. The entire plot with Luke drove me nuts from beginning to end. How does this guy end up with Mara Jade? Also the author put a lot of work into making two seperate races that were very specific in their weirdness. Everything about Nil Spaar and his kind was so very disturbing. All of that took a lot of work and imagination that really wasn't needed. I didn't need to know about his breed I feel like some of this story is the "I have this great idea" and then work backwards to make it work problem. The entire plot with Luke drove me nuts from beginning to end. How does this guy end up with Mara Jade? Also the author put a lot of work into making two seperate races that were very specific in their weirdness. Everything about Nil Spaar and his kind was so very disturbing. All of that took a lot of work and imagination that really wasn't needed. I didn't need to know about his breeding philosophies to know he was bad. I loved every scene with Han Solo. I can never get enough of him. There is something about him that brings truth( sometimes with humor) to every scene. There was so much drama in Leia's plotline. It seemed to be on endless repeat in this book, but I really enjoyed the scene with Mon Mothma. Chewbacca's story tried really hard. I'll give it that. I liked the loop around at the end. I think I'd like to read about Waroo's adventures. I still think Lando's plot had no real purpose. I see what it did, but honestly would it have changed the story much without it?

  11. 4 out of 5

    James Taylor

    It's been a bit of a slog to get through the series, but here I am at the conclusion to the trilogy. The three plot points essentially merge into two. Lando's plot is still irrelevant and should have been concluded in book 2. In the second book, the three plot points were addressed separately which was a good move, but now we are back to Lando's story been interspersed through the book. The overall trilogy is about “The Black Fleet”; an almost unstoppable fleet of ships, but yet the Yethetha take It's been a bit of a slog to get through the series, but here I am at the conclusion to the trilogy. The three plot points essentially merge into two. Lando's plot is still irrelevant and should have been concluded in book 2. In the second book, the three plot points were addressed separately which was a good move, but now we are back to Lando's story been interspersed through the book. The overall trilogy is about “The Black Fleet”; an almost unstoppable fleet of ships, but yet the Yethetha take over a few planets (only a couple are described, the rest happen behind the scenes) and so you don't get much action. You don't even get any build up, since this happens fairly early on in the series. The main story in this book doesn't really get going until halfway though the book; so until that point, you have to read superfluous plot threads. Once it does get going, it is fine and better than the second book; but still incredibly disappointing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JediKnight26

    The Tyrant’s Test was a very disappointing conclusion to a trilogy which simply did not live up to it’s potential. First, the final showdown with the main protagonist was anticlimactic. Then, Leia was underutilized in her story arch. And Luke’s story arch really accomplished nothing at all. It sort of contributed to his development as a Jedi, but overall Luke’s arch was much to do about nothing. Han was also underutilized. Finally, Lando’s story arch with the vagabond starship could have been to The Tyrant’s Test was a very disappointing conclusion to a trilogy which simply did not live up to it’s potential. First, the final showdown with the main protagonist was anticlimactic. Then, Leia was underutilized in her story arch. And Luke’s story arch really accomplished nothing at all. It sort of contributed to his development as a Jedi, but overall Luke’s arch was much to do about nothing. Han was also underutilized. Finally, Lando’s story arch with the vagabond starship could have been totally removed from the book. It’s a totally separate story, which is not that interesting, and it was not integrated very well with the main story arch. The best part of the story involved Chewbacca’s rescue operation, which was great. As a Star Wars fan, it saddens me to say that I would not recommend this book or this trilogy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Roberts

    Again, just ok. I gave this whole series a 3/5 stars for each book. The "Luke looking for his mother" plot was not very engaging, and ultimately disappointing. The main plot was ok, but the Yevetha just didn't pose that much of a threat. And the Lando vagabond plot ended kinda cool, but as it says, it was more of an "interlude" and interruption and could have jut been done as its own separate novella. Would suggest reading other star wars books, but if you have nothing left, then go ahead.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

    A good enough SW story in it's own right, but the subplot with Lando wasn't tied into the main story in any significant way and Luke's quest for his mother turning out to be a wild goose chase was a pretty annoying. Still McDowell has a really good handle on these characters and the world-building in these three novels is the best I've encountered in an EU story since the Thrawn trilogy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David

    All is all a good read. Far better than the previous in the Legends continuity. This book still leaves me wondering several things 1) why did Akanah need Luke in her quest? She could have done everything they did Solo. It's never really explained 2) what was the point of the vagabond side story with Lando all about? It's got an ending that will have no consequences on any future storylines.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Pelto

    He is a really good author for this type of book, but it suffers from multiple endings syndrome, and some of those endings aren't very fulfilling. Leia is put to great use, and not disregarded as being inept as many post Thrawn trilogy authors have done.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Good read, this series was ok and I like that Chewy the Dad has a life. Didn't feel like an Epic novel, more like a great t.v. series but still a good read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hoey

    The plot dragged and it moved from one plot to the other without warning and no satisfying conclusion. Sadly I wouldn't recommend it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stormy

    I enjoyed finishing the trilogy with my son reading it through Kindle. It ties up all the plot lines started in the first two books, if in a meandering way.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Greg Allbee

    Finally some payoff after two previous books of plodding plot. Things finally start to happen and resolve, with some excitement that kept me turning the page.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexandr Iscenco

    A rewarding conclusion to the Black Fleet Trilogy, although a bit hastened when it came to the final battle.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This didn't end with anything too spectacular. The first book of the series starts of pretty well but it drags on too much during books two and three without too many interesting things happenings. But the stories themselves are interesting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    This book began so much better than the previous two books in the trilogy. Chewbacca and his son Lumpy were great together, and it was very interesting to see more of the Wookiee culture. The scene with Lumpy's rite of passage makes "A Forest Apart" seem inconsequential, as a lot of the same themes show up here. I also completely forgot about the name change until I looked up the difference in names on wookieepedia. I felt bad that Chewie didn't let Freyrr take his place, but I completely unders This book began so much better than the previous two books in the trilogy. Chewbacca and his son Lumpy were great together, and it was very interesting to see more of the Wookiee culture. The scene with Lumpy's rite of passage makes "A Forest Apart" seem inconsequential, as a lot of the same themes show up here. I also completely forgot about the name change until I looked up the difference in names on wookieepedia. I felt bad that Chewie didn't let Freyrr take his place, but I completely understand that code of honor. Actually, the book is weird: it's the best of the trilogy in content and worst with regards to writing style. After every even chapter is an "interlude" focusing on Lando's situation, but these interludes are nearly as long as the other chapters! The continuous change in "formula (the first book was straight through, the second was broken into 3 sections, and this one has random interludes that still don't give much to the overall plot) make it feel like three separate authors were involved. Additionally, there is a lot of repetition here, and it drives me nuts. For example, on one page in the interlude between chapters 8 and 9, five sentences begin with the word "But." In another section, two or three sentences in the same paragraph begin with "As he made..." Han in captivity also held my attention more than a lot of the previous books. It makes sense though, since the Leia section of book 2 was my favorite. And, the Plat Mallar subplot is just as interesting as it was in book 2. Even Lando's bits, as pointless as they seem, are interesting. The Qella orrery sounds absolutely breathtaking. By the end of chapter 2, I wasn't sure if I liked Drayson anymore. I love how A'baht takes charge of how to handle the Yevetha, how to goad them into fighting. I liked him in book 2, but he's even better now, IMO. I can't stand Akanah, and have despised her more and more. She truly does flip-flop between thoughts. And, she doesn't trust Luke. I really, really like his explanation that maybe Leia's "memories" of their mother are made up, a child's dream; Akanah is always wiling to find conspiracies. On top of that, she's a bit hypocritical. She doesn't think it's okay to kill someone, finding that to be an utter stain on a soul, but it's perfectly okay to just go and steal someone's ship, possibly leaving them stranded. And she's a liar - she HASN'T committed "everything" to finding the Current; if that wasn't the case, she wouldn't be so uptight about killing to get her way. I know - for some other character I'd likely nitpick less, but anything that gets me to dislike her more works for me. (Then at the end - she's a total pathological liar! And Luke leaves her and misses her "honest tears." No. If 90% of your words are lies, you can't call your tears honest.) I don't like Dall Thara Du's suggestion about Leia using Luke BUT I agree with her bringing him up. How come no one else before now has questioned where Luke is? Luke things Leia is too stubborn to ask for help, but he's too stubborn to offer it. Leia taking down Ourn was gratifying, as was her chastising Graf for exempting anyone from investigation because of their name or rank. The mystique around the Qella intrigued me. Brand and the Vagabond vs. the Yevethan was written well. I wish we saw more of the Solo kids in this trilogy. I like Enara. I think we only get a reminder about the fact that this is about the Black Sword Command at the very end. Sorannan taking down Nil Spaar was satisfying. Things I Can't Believe Were Said - Han saying "son of a b__" - "Ho! Huzzah!"

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    When an author writes a multi-book saga of well over 1000 pages that includes multiple plot lines and dozens of characters, they clearly have epic aspirations. But the payoff must live up to the promises made by the storyteller and in the case of the Black Fleet Crisis, that simply doesn't happen. In the final book of the trilogy, Chewbacca learns of Han's imprisonment and leaves Kashyyyk to mount a suicidal rescue mission to save him. Meanwhile, Leia is fighting a political battle to keep her jo When an author writes a multi-book saga of well over 1000 pages that includes multiple plot lines and dozens of characters, they clearly have epic aspirations. But the payoff must live up to the promises made by the storyteller and in the case of the Black Fleet Crisis, that simply doesn't happen. In the final book of the trilogy, Chewbacca learns of Han's imprisonment and leaves Kashyyyk to mount a suicidal rescue mission to save him. Meanwhile, Leia is fighting a political battle to keep her job as President while facing off with the existential threat that the evil Yevethan race represent to the New Republic. Lando, Lobot and the droids are still stuck on the Teljkon Vagabond, whose purpose is finally revealed. And Luke's story, traveling with Akanah of the adepts of the White Current, finally intersects with the other plot lines. Here are a few of my problems with this book: - The Luke and Akanah story feels like a Deus ex Machina device. It doesn't really further Luke's character development and it only connects with the rest of the stories at the very end and only long enough for the adepts to ride over the hill and save the day like the Cavalry in an old Western movie. Much of Akanah's story is revealed to be only partially true and so, as the reader probably guessed a long time ago, Luke has been manipulated. - Chewbacca comes across as brave, but a bit reckless and stupid. I have a hard time buying it. - The villains have NO redeeming characteristics and are portrayed in the most violent and brutal way possible. There are one or two pretty bloody scenes in this series and they are a bit shocking. The Star Wars universe has always been PG-13 at worst. Some of the stuff that happens here felt more like it belonged in an R-rated "Alien" movie. - Pacifism and diplomacy are both ridiculed. Because the villains are so evil and disgusting, the only possible approach is violent conflict to beat them into submission or destroy them. Anyone who thinks otherwise is portrayed as stupid or naïve. (Where have we in the USA heard that one before?) - The Lando story doesn't really connect with the other material at all. As I stated in one of my earlier reviews it seems more like an Arthur C. Clarke tale of exploration. Why is this subplot in here? - For a book that is primarily a military SF tale, the final space battle is boring. And a little unclear. There are several plot devices used to help the New Republic win against their implacable enemy, but Kube-McDowell doesn't really commit wholeheartedly to any of them. It feels like he is hedging his bets rather than going for the one, dramatic stroke that turns the tide. - I still don't know what The Black Fleet is. To be clear, it's not that this book is terrible. It's just not all that good. And the lofty aspirations of the complex plot structure that Kube-McDowell has generated don't work together in the way he expects or that the reader would like. Unless you're an EU completist, I would avoid this series. It doesn't add much to the canon and I think you'll be disappointed at the end.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patrickderaaff

    Finally finished this book. During some especially boring stuff on the Qella ship or war stuff in space I started speadreading through it because of the endless pages without anything actually happening. Leia finally started behaving like herself again, I still believe she would have handled this crisis more determinedly even with Coruscant politics weighing her down. The storyline with Luke and the Fallanassi was a waste of time, Luke´s unrest which led him to go on a quest for his mother and t Finally finished this book. During some especially boring stuff on the Qella ship or war stuff in space I started speadreading through it because of the endless pages without anything actually happening. Leia finally started behaving like herself again, I still believe she would have handled this crisis more determinedly even with Coruscant politics weighing her down. The storyline with Luke and the Fallanassi was a waste of time, Luke´s unrest which led him to go on a quest for his mother and trust the wretched Akanah made no sense to me. A Jedi master who has come as far as he has would be at peace with himself and his place in the Galaxy. I was glad that in this book he was getting as fed up with Akanah as I was with her since book 1. Han´s role was as victim of the Yevetha and bait for Chief Of State Leia and he was tortured and kicked around some. We get to see how tough he is, but otherwise he didn´t add much to the story. Chewbacca was written well I thought. Good to see how he feels about Han and his lifedebt to him and how he trains his son on his journey towards adulthood. Lando, Lobot and the droids spent more time in the Qella ship and bored me to tears. New Republic military stuff bored me some more and there were also some scientist researching the Qella, more boredom, and Yevetha creeps calling humans vermin, which is the pot calling the kettle black really. A lot of talk about honour, but of course they are just ruthless disgusting beings and pretty stereotype. Hope they never resurface in the EU. I did like the resolution of the Qella history storyline at the end of the book, though it had nothing to do with the whole Yevetha crisis at all. All in all a rather forgetable trilogy that could have benefited from a good editor cutting a lot of boring stuf, cut, cut, cut and making it a duology. And getting the characters to behave more like themselves and taking into account their personal growth from all the stuff they went through to get to this point in their lifes. To new readers, skip this trilogy and you won´t miss much, only die-hard Star Wars EU fans should pick it up, but be warned: your patience will be tried.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Kay

    I greatly enjoyed this trilogy! It was very intense. Funny the ones I like are the ones other people don't on here! This set had a very complex story line and while it did end a bit short I will not put it down for that. The only way around that would be writing 3 or more books! This book (Tyrant's Test) unlike the other two, was written in chapters with Interludes's about Lando through out as it take some time to connect his story with everyone else's. The Yevetha ARE unlike any enemy they have I greatly enjoyed this trilogy! It was very intense. Funny the ones I like are the ones other people don't on here! This set had a very complex story line and while it did end a bit short I will not put it down for that. The only way around that would be writing 3 or more books! This book (Tyrant's Test) unlike the other two, was written in chapters with Interludes's about Lando through out as it take some time to connect his story with everyone else's. The Yevetha ARE unlike any enemy they have faced thus far. I have seen them likened to the Nazis but I would say not really. They are the worst parts put together of the worst of the world that we know. Unlike with The Crystal Star where it was obvious Hitler and the Hitler Youth was the inspiration the Yevetha are a new group to themselfes.These creatures are bad with no apparent redemption quality. (I would like to note that this trilagy is not for younger Star Wars fans. It gets pretty violent and also has some adult subject matter.) A more detailed reveiw here... http://amandakayhowell.blogspot.com/2...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    I thoroughly enjoyed this series. It is quite excellent and is quality work throughout. This is the best series since the Thrawn trilogy... ...except... ...the ending. Wow. It almost seems like the author had painted himself in a corner and didn't know how to wrap up all the threads. There are multiple threads in this series, several very important story lines going on. Some of them are wrapped up in a satisfying manner. Others...not so much. In the end, like I said, I was very happy with the seri I thoroughly enjoyed this series. It is quite excellent and is quality work throughout. This is the best series since the Thrawn trilogy... ...except... ...the ending. Wow. It almost seems like the author had painted himself in a corner and didn't know how to wrap up all the threads. There are multiple threads in this series, several very important story lines going on. Some of them are wrapped up in a satisfying manner. Others...not so much. In the end, like I said, I was very happy with the series, I just wish the author had spent more time on the endings, or consulted with other authors, or something else. I don't know what happened. Overall, I left the series mostly satisfied. It's better than anything Kevin J. Anderson or Barbara Hambly wrote, and (even though this book refers to events in the series) it can't be compared with the god-awful Dark Empire I and II comic books. Would I recommend reading this series? If you are a Star Wars Extended Universe fan, I would say that it is a MUST READ. Just don't expect a slam-bang, shocking, OMG THIS IS THE BEST BOOK EVER ending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nom Chompsky

    What a weird end to a weird trilogy. I have to admit I expected the Lando plot to become relevant to everything else at some point but it never did. And I was so excited to see Chewbacca and co. get some 'time on the ice,' but it was so sparing and superficial. All this said, my fav hokey Star Wars line ever comes this offering, antithetical to the iconic "these aren't the droids you're looking for," Luke tells Leia "I'm the Jedi uncle you're looking for." So saccharine and tidy an ending, and s What a weird end to a weird trilogy. I have to admit I expected the Lando plot to become relevant to everything else at some point but it never did. And I was so excited to see Chewbacca and co. get some 'time on the ice,' but it was so sparing and superficial. All this said, my fav hokey Star Wars line ever comes this offering, antithetical to the iconic "these aren't the droids you're looking for," Luke tells Leia "I'm the Jedi uncle you're looking for." So saccharine and tidy an ending, and such a strange enemy (and quick defeat), as if Bantam were dipping their toes to see how a Vong-like threat would work (though the living ships here are not inherently evil by their grotesqueness, and are so exciting and I could talk about them for a long time). I feel like three separate novels, one for Leia/Han/Chewie, another for Luke, and another for Lando & co., would have made the best delivery for these tales, because they lack harmony, and the chopped structure seems only to clog and slow down what might be better off on its own. Prose was okay. Very middle of the road novel, but reading the trilogy just for context to its middle piece would worth it no matter.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I enjoyed the Leia vs. the Yevetha storyline throughout this series. There were a lot of times where I felt that the author did a huge disservice to Leia's characterization, but the storyline itself I enjoyed. I enjoyed Chewbacca's role in this final book of the trilogy. Lando and Luke's roles and storylines just didn't flow with the rest of it, though. By this book, I was tired of both of them. Luke was annoying (though I find him to be so in most of the books), and his traveling companion (Akan I enjoyed the Leia vs. the Yevetha storyline throughout this series. There were a lot of times where I felt that the author did a huge disservice to Leia's characterization, but the storyline itself I enjoyed. I enjoyed Chewbacca's role in this final book of the trilogy. Lando and Luke's roles and storylines just didn't flow with the rest of it, though. By this book, I was tired of both of them. Luke was annoying (though I find him to be so in most of the books), and his traveling companion (Akanah) was infuriating. I actually think the Qella thread could have been the focus of its own storyline. I also don't think the author really built up Luke's thought processes enough for his decision at the very end concerning his niece and nephews. I felt cheated when we didn't really witness a vital part of Han's storyline. Overall, I still liked the story more than I have many of the others, hence the three stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    In the end, I am rather disappointed. This was a series that I felt held promise in the first two books, and I still feel it was much better written than a lot of Star Wars books. However, I feel that the story should have been told in two books. This last book took me a while to get through, as the first half of the book literally was no extension of anything that had happened in the second book. Once things got moving, issues were solved rather quickly, which made the earlier struggles seem so In the end, I am rather disappointed. This was a series that I felt held promise in the first two books, and I still feel it was much better written than a lot of Star Wars books. However, I feel that the story should have been told in two books. This last book took me a while to get through, as the first half of the book literally was no extension of anything that had happened in the second book. Once things got moving, issues were solved rather quickly, which made the earlier struggles seem somewhat silly, if the problems were that easy to overcome. Lando's story simply dragged in this book, and the resolution felt so unconnected to everything and rather pointless to me.... I get the idea that it was to help resolve Luke's issues, but it came off as rather anti-climactice, considering we had been following this tale for three books. Overall, I liked the adult treatment of the reader by this series, but the last book fell rather flat in the end.

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