counter create hit Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model? - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model?

Availability: Ready to download

Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model? The book examines the organized labor business model from the perspectives of the economic and political influences of organized labor, relative to the domestic and global economy. The traditional organized labor business model, as we have known it over the past century, is not sustainable in it present form, and will become le Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model? The book examines the organized labor business model from the perspectives of the economic and political influences of organized labor, relative to the domestic and global economy. The traditional organized labor business model, as we have known it over the past century, is not sustainable in it present form, and will become less relevant, irrelevant or extinct, unless major changes are made. The nature of work has changed, and labor unions have failed to evolve with this change, just as dinosaurs became extinct because they failed to evolve with the climatic changes. Union representation serves a very important business and economic function. Repressive employers create strong unions, because unions protect workers from abusive management. The organized labor business model for growth is to unionize low-wage workers, such as immigrants, minorities, and females, in industries and locations with traditionally low union saturation. Historically, labor unions have encouraged an adversarial (us versus them) approach to business operations. The key to long-term survival, increased economic strength, and political power lies in the ability of organized labor to adapt to changes, become productive allies with business, and be part of the solution, not part of the problem. To do less will result in a decayed organized labor business model creating its own irrelevance and going the way of the dinosaurs.


Compare

Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model? The book examines the organized labor business model from the perspectives of the economic and political influences of organized labor, relative to the domestic and global economy. The traditional organized labor business model, as we have known it over the past century, is not sustainable in it present form, and will become le Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model? The book examines the organized labor business model from the perspectives of the economic and political influences of organized labor, relative to the domestic and global economy. The traditional organized labor business model, as we have known it over the past century, is not sustainable in it present form, and will become less relevant, irrelevant or extinct, unless major changes are made. The nature of work has changed, and labor unions have failed to evolve with this change, just as dinosaurs became extinct because they failed to evolve with the climatic changes. Union representation serves a very important business and economic function. Repressive employers create strong unions, because unions protect workers from abusive management. The organized labor business model for growth is to unionize low-wage workers, such as immigrants, minorities, and females, in industries and locations with traditionally low union saturation. Historically, labor unions have encouraged an adversarial (us versus them) approach to business operations. The key to long-term survival, increased economic strength, and political power lies in the ability of organized labor to adapt to changes, become productive allies with business, and be part of the solution, not part of the problem. To do less will result in a decayed organized labor business model creating its own irrelevance and going the way of the dinosaurs.

7 review for Is Organized Labor A Decaying Business Model?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Mosquera

    Excellent and well researched analysis of labor unions from economic sustainability and business model perspectives. Given that modern business is global and automation and computers have taken over jobs, can the archaic business model of traditional labor unions compete in the global marketplace? Corporate economic survival requires companies to lower their labor costs to remain competitive. Outsourcing to low wage nations and non-union lower wages states is one of many solutions to reducing cos Excellent and well researched analysis of labor unions from economic sustainability and business model perspectives. Given that modern business is global and automation and computers have taken over jobs, can the archaic business model of traditional labor unions compete in the global marketplace? Corporate economic survival requires companies to lower their labor costs to remain competitive. Outsourcing to low wage nations and non-union lower wages states is one of many solutions to reducing costs and remaining competitive. Is organized labor going the way of the horse and buggy? The answer is YES unless labor unions adjust to the global economy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I hold a degree in Economics and work for a union company - need I offer any more reasons why I would read this? Pretty predictable, for someone who studied econ for a few years, but nevertheless very interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Organized labor is business? Read this book you will have a better picture. Excellent!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris Mosquera

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Mosquera

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.