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Quiller KGB

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Somebody wants to spoil German unification, kill it dead. Who can it be? Who can find out? Who better than Quiller! On site Quiller moves fast...too fast. He finds the target but gets targeted himself. He needs all of his luck, cunning and skill or this could be his last case! "Nobody writes bettes espionage than Adam Hall!" (The New York Times)


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Somebody wants to spoil German unification, kill it dead. Who can it be? Who can find out? Who better than Quiller! On site Quiller moves fast...too fast. He finds the target but gets targeted himself. He needs all of his luck, cunning and skill or this could be his last case! "Nobody writes bettes espionage than Adam Hall!" (The New York Times)

30 review for Quiller KGB

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Another strong entry in the Quiller series. There are several hair's breadth escapes that kept me turning the pages, but which were nevertheless relatively believable, and the plot is convoluted enough to keep me guessing to the end. Quiller himself does not change except perhaps that he admits to a bit more fear and contemplates his own death a little more readily, and Adam Hall could still stand to work on his endings it took me several times reading the last couple pages to really understand Another strong entry in the Quiller series. There are several hair's breadth escapes that kept me turning the pages, but which were nevertheless relatively believable, and the plot is convoluted enough to keep me guessing to the end. Quiller himself does not change except perhaps that he admits to a bit more fear and contemplates his own death a little more readily, and Adam Hall could still stand to work on his endings it took me several times reading the last couple pages to really understand what had happened. Reading this in 2017 one wonders what the author would have thought of Putin. Popsugar challenge 2017: an espionage thriller

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    Another strong entry, and I liked Cone (a first appearance); this isn't the height of the series but it certainly kept me on board. The very final denouement was a trifle 'blink and you'll miss it' but the strength of Hall's writing more than makes up for it. Just what I needed, today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Garry Wall

    Elleston Trevor (Adam Hall) never disappoints. Quiller is the thinking man's James Bond.

  4. 4 out of 5

    cool breeze

    Quiller is asked to work with the KGB, instead of against it. The goal is to stop a plot targeting Mikhail Gorbachev, or is it two plots? Notable for speculating about the fall of the Berlin Wall just before it happened, this Quiller novel doesn’t stand out in any other way and the whole series has become quite formulaic. This is the 13th in the series and there has been little or no development, growth or evolution in the central Quiller character the whole time. The settings and supporting cas Quiller is asked to work with the KGB, instead of against it. The goal is to stop a plot targeting Mikhail Gorbachev, or is it two plots? Notable for speculating about the fall of the Berlin Wall just before it happened, this Quiller novel doesn’t stand out in any other way and the whole series has become quite formulaic. This is the 13th in the series and there has been little or no development, growth or evolution in the central Quiller character the whole time. The settings and supporting cast change to add a little spice, but it is always the same basic recipe and that is starting to wear pretty thin. The ending feels weak and rushed, as if to make a publication deadline. Hall’s writing idiosyncrasies are also getting more out of hand. What was occasionally amusing initially is now all too frequently distracting. In each of the last three Quiller novels, it has become progressively clearer that Adam Hall believes the Soviet Union is a permanent fixture on the international scene and the West has to find a way to live with it. He has an unnatural fetish for summits as the way to do this (he likes Nixon on this score and obviously dislikes Reagan and Bush Sr.). He has a schoolgirl crush on Gorbachev. He is clearly sympathetic to the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament’s program of unilateral disarmament by the Western European nations. All very ironic, as the book was published in July 1989 and the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989, and not at all in the way Hall imagined it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jak60

    This was the first Adam Hall book I ever read; as a big fan of spy stories (and in particular of the early Le Carré ones), I had mixed feelings about "Quiller KGB". The story is intriguing, the narration is essential and tense, the novel has many of the typical ingredients of the good old cold war spystories....though by no means this could be put next, not to say compared, to absolute masterpieces of the genre such as The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. What I found odd in the book is that the wr This was the first Adam Hall book I ever read; as a big fan of spy stories (and in particular of the early Le Carré ones), I had mixed feelings about "Quiller KGB". The story is intriguing, the narration is essential and tense, the novel has many of the typical ingredients of the good old cold war spystories....though by no means this could be put next, not to say compared, to absolute masterpieces of the genre such as The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. What I found odd in the book is that the writing style is at times difficult to follow; some sentences are constructed in an awkward way, making it hard to understand who's saying what and why and when (lots of phrase in italic: are they flashbacks? Someone else speaking? Or maybe an inner conversation between Quiller and his mind? Or a blend of all this? Well, up to you to figure out...); plus sometimes the narration jumps suddenly from one situation to another without possibility to understand what happened in-between - a few times I went back in search of a chapter which I thought could be missing, but it was not... Overall, I thought it was an ok book, I was a little surprised by the end, which I found rather flat.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andy Lawless

    Of all the spy books that I have read, this series is probably the best, for it uses real trade craft instead of relying on a lot of fancy gadgets. The series has been compared favorably to John Le Carré's Smiley. Under the pseudonym "Adam Hall", Trevor Dudley-Smith wrote the Quiller spy novel series, beginning with The Berlin Memorandum (US: The Quiller Memorandum, 1965), a hybrid of glamour and dirt, Fleming and Le Carré. The writing is literary and the tradecraft believable. (From Ask.com spy Of all the spy books that I have read, this series is probably the best, for it uses real trade craft instead of relying on a lot of fancy gadgets. The series has been compared favorably to John Le Carré's Smiley. Under the pseudonym "Adam Hall", Trevor Dudley-Smith wrote the Quiller spy novel series, beginning with The Berlin Memorandum (US: The Quiller Memorandum, 1965), a hybrid of glamour and dirt, Fleming and Le Carré. The writing is literary and the tradecraft believable. (From Ask.com spy fiction)

  7. 4 out of 5

    stormhawk

    Set mainly in East Berlin when reunification was a remote possibility, Quiller KGB offers an uncomfortable alliance between an agent who has trouble working and playing well with others at the best of times and a KGB officer as they try to preserve the best hope for a peaceful future and an end to the Cold War. It's a good thing that ferrets have more than nine lives to play with.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Reread rating between 3.5 & 4 Reread rating between 3.5 & 4

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christine Petty

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ann E. Singleton

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gsanoff

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Rom

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  14. 4 out of 5

    mkl

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lavonne

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mcurtis3

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Cavaco

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Johnson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard Curran

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Smith

  21. 4 out of 5

    Terry Austrew

  22. 5 out of 5

    Books-fly-to-me

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard Wallington

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rahul Rajanathan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alan Marston

  26. 4 out of 5

    Glen Mackie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vanderbilt34a

  28. 4 out of 5

    Micah Stupak

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mousum

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Boulogne

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