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What It Means to be Palestinian: Stories of Palestinian Peoplehood

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What It Means to be Palestinian is a narrative of narratives, a collection of personal stories, remembered feelings and reconstructed experiences by different Palestinians whose lives were changed and shaped by history. Their stories are told chronologically through particular phases of the Palestinian national struggle, providing a composite autobiography of Palestine as What It Means to be Palestinian is a narrative of narratives, a collection of personal stories, remembered feelings and reconstructed experiences by different Palestinians whose lives were changed and shaped by history. Their stories are told chronologically through particular phases of the Palestinian national struggle, providing a composite autobiography of Palestine as a landscape and as a people. The book begins with the 1936 revolt against British rule in Palestine and ends in 1993, with the Oslo peace agreement that changed the nature and form of the national struggle. It is based on in-depth interviews and conversations with Palestinians, male and female, old and young, rich and poor, religious and secular, in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Israel and the Occupied Territories. Presented as remembered personal narratives and as "social" histories, these conversations provide a deep and intimate account of what it means to be Palestinian in the 21st century. 


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What It Means to be Palestinian is a narrative of narratives, a collection of personal stories, remembered feelings and reconstructed experiences by different Palestinians whose lives were changed and shaped by history. Their stories are told chronologically through particular phases of the Palestinian national struggle, providing a composite autobiography of Palestine as What It Means to be Palestinian is a narrative of narratives, a collection of personal stories, remembered feelings and reconstructed experiences by different Palestinians whose lives were changed and shaped by history. Their stories are told chronologically through particular phases of the Palestinian national struggle, providing a composite autobiography of Palestine as a landscape and as a people. The book begins with the 1936 revolt against British rule in Palestine and ends in 1993, with the Oslo peace agreement that changed the nature and form of the national struggle. It is based on in-depth interviews and conversations with Palestinians, male and female, old and young, rich and poor, religious and secular, in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Israel and the Occupied Territories. Presented as remembered personal narratives and as "social" histories, these conversations provide a deep and intimate account of what it means to be Palestinian in the 21st century. 

49 review for What It Means to be Palestinian: Stories of Palestinian Peoplehood

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suad Shamma

    This book was such an eye-opener. A wonderful read by Dina Matar who went around collecting people's stories of their experiences before and during the war in Palestine. The stories begin as far back as the 1930's and end in present time. It is written in chronological order, with every chapter consisting of - on average - 7 personal stories, with Dina providing an introduction and a bit of history before the telling of these stories. She writes that although these stories were translated from Ar This book was such an eye-opener. A wonderful read by Dina Matar who went around collecting people's stories of their experiences before and during the war in Palestine. The stories begin as far back as the 1930's and end in present time. It is written in chronological order, with every chapter consisting of - on average - 7 personal stories, with Dina providing an introduction and a bit of history before the telling of these stories. She writes that although these stories were translated from Arabic, she attempted to stay true to the storytelling with very minor edits made. Reading those stories in chronological order from different people's viewpoints was very heartbreaking from me. I have never had the good fortune of visiting my homeland - Palestine. Born in 88, all I know is what I see on TV and read in books. I have never seen Palestine pre-1948, and it was beautiful to hear some of these stories from people who lived these times. These are definitely the kind of stories we need to remind us of what used to be and what is. The stories we need to learn in order to pass them on to future generations. Great read, and highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hajer Hajer

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aya Baker

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maria Marsh

  5. 4 out of 5

    Khaled AlShihabi

  6. 5 out of 5

    Renée

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nursheila Muez

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nejmeh_habib

  10. 4 out of 5

    C

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Elmeshad

  12. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Jareño

  13. 4 out of 5

    Max Mason

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marcy

  15. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tess Waggoner

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anoud Alammar

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ds_Sourav

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carole

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aisling

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt Atkinson

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Baldwin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  24. 4 out of 5

    Genae Matthews

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ivana Godula

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kat Balitsos

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Harris

  28. 4 out of 5

    Olav

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Keating

  30. 4 out of 5

    Farah

  31. 5 out of 5

    PB

  32. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Martin

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dala Hadidi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Ghada Arafat

  36. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  37. 5 out of 5

    Siddartha

  38. 4 out of 5

    Annabelle

  39. 4 out of 5

    Hameed Mufeez

  40. 5 out of 5

    Nina J

  41. 5 out of 5

    Farrah

  42. 4 out of 5

    هيا الأسير

  43. 4 out of 5

    Jehan

  44. 4 out of 5

    Bedoor Khalaf

  45. 5 out of 5

    Walaء

  46. 4 out of 5

    Farah

  47. 4 out of 5

    Mouna

  48. 5 out of 5

    Kireja

  49. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

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